Thursday, February 25

Science

Science

Woolly mammoths were hit by climate change but humans wiped them out

By Michael Marshall Woolly Mammoths may have been wiped out by climate change and human hunting combining to devastating effectScience Picture Co/AlamyThe extinction of woolly mammoths was caused by a combination of climate change and human hunting, according to a study that simulated the processes that drove their demise. The simulation suggests that the mammoths would not have died out when they did if it were not for humans. “In the absence of humans, we would expect woolly mammoths would have persisted for an extra 4000 years in some areas,” says Damien Fordham at the University of Adelaide in South Australia. … Source link
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Best snow pants to keep you cozy (and active) all winter long

Stay dry in the wet weather. (Karsten Winegeart via Unsplash/)Snow pants are the ultimate winter weather accessory: they keep you warm, don’t encumber movement, and fit right on top of the clothes you’re already wearing (meaning, if you live in a snowy area, you’d be remiss not to own a pair). Whether you’re backcountry skiing, flying down the slopes on a snowboard, or walking the kids to school in a blizzard (uphill...both ways), insulated pants are the way to go.Historically speaking, ski bibs were the precursor to the now prolific snow pants: those, all-in-one, overall-esque outfits that we first saw on the slopes in the 1940s. Since then, snow gear has made some serious strides, and innovations in breathability, insulation, and style have made snow pants more comfortable—and reliabl...
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A shadow snake has been rediscovered in Ecuador after 54 years

By Jake Buehler The head of a Fugler’s shadow snake, which was found in EcuadorScott J. Trageser, The Biodiversity GroupAfter a long hiatus, a mysterious reptile has slithered back into the light. Researchers working in Ecuador’s tropical rainforests report that Fugler’s shadow snake (Emmochliophis fugleri) has been found alive after more than five decades of absence from the scientific record. In 2019, Ross Maynard and Scott Trageser, both conservation biologists at The Biodiversity Group in Arizona, were conducting amphibian and reptile surveys in the Río Manduriacu Reserve on the Pacific-facing slopes of Ecuador’s Andes Mountains. The two researchers … ...
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This Airbus prototype could deploy drones from cargo planes

A view of the launcher, and drone, in the back of the aircraft. (Airbus/)For a small aircraft, any stretch of open sky can become a runway, if another plane is able to carry it to altitude first. On December 9, 2020, Airbus revealed a prototype of an airborne launcher that is designed to carefully release uncrewed aerial vehicles, or drones, from the loading ramp of a cargo aircraft into the sky while in flight.This launcher is built to go in an Airbus A400M, a four-engined turboprop transport that entered service with France in 2013, and has since been adopted by other nation’s militaries. The plane has a range of 2,100 miles with a full payload just shy of 82,000 pounds, but can go further if it carries less weight.In an announcement video, Airbus showed an aerial target drone inside ...
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Virtual computer chip tests expose flaws and protect against hackers

By Matthew Sparkes Testing real-world computer chips is far slower than virtually modelling themSergii Gnatiuk/AlamyTesting new computer chips for security and reliability often takes longer than designing them. A new method for modelling them virtually and testing them with programs traditionally used for software instead of hardware could slash development time. Current hardware testing either randomly probes a chip to find flaws or seeks to formally test every single possible input and output on each computer chip. The first approach can easily miss problems and the second quickly becomes infeasible for all but the simplest designs. Either way, this can take … ...
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Best laser printer: For the home or for your office

Make sure you've got a laser printer that will reliably spit out as many pages as you need. (Annie Spratt via Unsplash/)Searching for the best printers for your home? Selecting the best laser printer for you can be a bit complicated. There is a series of factors, costs, and features that you’ll want to take into account before making your purchase. To start, you’ll want to decide whether you need to print in color. Laser printers, while delivering blazing-fast printing speeds, do not handle the complex colors associated with photos well at all. Furthermore, color toner for laser printers is price-prohibitive.If you’re buying a laser printer you’ll probably be paying a higher entry cost than if you were buying an inkjet, but you stand to make up that cost, because laser printers use ink ...
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Why are we still disinfecting surfaces to stop COVID-19?

Cookie SettingsMany products featured on this site were editorially chosen. Popular Science may receive financial compensation for products purchased through this site.Copyright © 2021 Popular Science. A Bonnier Corporation Company. All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited.!function(a,c,b,d,e,f,g){a.fbq||(e=a.fbq=function(){e.callMethod?e.callMethod.apply(e,arguments):e.queue.push(arguments)},!a._fbq&&(a._fbq=e),e.push=e,e.loaded=!0,e.version='2.0',e.queue=[],f=c.createElement(b),f.async=!0,f.src=d,g=c.getElementsByTagName(b)[0],g.parentNode.insertBefore(f,g))}(window,document,'script','//connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js'),fbq('init','1482788748627554'),fbq('track','PageView'); Source link
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Earliest human ancestors may have swung on branches like chimps

By Karina Shah The skull of Ardipithecus ramidus – a hominin that swung from branches?PvE/AlamyOur distant ancestors may have swung from branches and knuckle-walked like a chimpanzee – challenging recent thinking that the earliest hominins did neither. That is the conclusion of an analysis of 4.4-million-year-old Ardipithecus ramidus, thought to be one of the earliest known hominins. In popular thinking, humans are often imagined to have evolved from a chimpanzee-like ape, but many researchers now challenge this idea – particularly in light of fossil evidence from A. ramidus that was published in 2009. One well-preserved individual – nicknamed Ardi – had bones that suggested it typically walked alo...
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Diplodocus-like fossil in Uzbekistan hints Asia was a dinosaur hub

By Krista Charles Dzharatitanis kingi lived about 90 million years agoAlexander AverianovA Diplodocus-like dinosaur is the first of its kind to be found in Asia, suggesting the landmass could have helped dinosaurs reach other regions and that this group was more widely distributed across the planet than previously thought. Hans-Dieter Sues at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, and his colleague Alexander Averianov at the Russian Academy of Sciences described the dinosaur from a fossil found in Uzbekistan. They named the dinosaur Dzharatitanis kingi after the Dzharakuduk region in which it was found, as well as in honour of deceased colleague Christopher King, who had contributed to the ...
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Netflix’s Space Sweepers review: A silly but profound space opera

By Simon Ings In Space Sweepers, the crew of the Victory makes an astonishing discoveryNetflixSpace Sweepers Jo Sung-hee Advertisement Netflix TAE-HO is a sweeper-up of other people’s orbital junk, a mudlark in space scavenging anything of value. In Jo Sung-hee’s new movie Space Sweepers, he is someone who is most alone in a crowd – that is to say, among his crewmates on the spaceship Victory. They are a predictable assortment: a feisty robot with detachable feet; a heavily armed yet disarmingly gamine captain; a gnarly but lovable engineer with a p...